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SOCIETY OF LAND SPEED RACING HISTORIANS
NEWSLETTER 288 - July 19, 2013
Editor: Richard Parks, Rnparks1@Juno.com 
President of the Society: Jim Miller, 1-818-846-5139.
Photographic Editor of the Society
: Roger Rohrdanz, beachtruck@juno.com
Northern California Reporter: Spencer Simon, sparklecraftspecial@yahoo.com
Field Reporter/Historian: Bob Falcon, RFalcon500@aol.com

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Some Names To Look For In This Newsletter:
GUEST COLUMNIST: By Jerry Cornelison, from the Road Runners; ASSIGNED STAFF EDITORIAL by Richard Parks; I thought it was a good idea to catalog and write on the old speed shops though I did ask the shops before to see if they want to do an article; STAFF NOTES: the following comes from www.pricemuseumofspeed.org; STAFF NOTES: Evelyn Roth, from www.oilstick.com, sent in the following link; Editor’s notes: The following was sent in by Robin Millar and is from material that will go into the program for the Palos Verdes Concours; Some of you have been there, some may never make time, but all will marvel at this American cradle of speed and beauty; I saw that you had linked to AutoHistory.org in the past and wanted to reach out to you  with an infographic my team is promoting this week on the history of the automotive  industry; STAFF NOTES: the following comes from the SAH website, courtesy of Aria Cahill; I wanted to pass on the following Facebook link for you to check out and hopefully place on your "watch" list; You might be interested in this Society http://www.facebook.com/pages/Drag-Racing-Memorabilia-Society-of-America/382747922717; Aussie Invader July 2013 Newsletter, from Roscoe McGlashon; THE BACK FENCE MOB. By Le Roi Tex Smith; STAFF NOTES: the following email comes from Jessica Clark who is attempting to make a career in stock car racing; STAFF NOTES: the following was sent to us by Jeff DeMarey; I just received word that registration for the October Texas Mile in Beeville, Texas, will be available August 1th at 2PM. If you are hoping to race there, be ready to file the paperwork "at that hour" as entries fill quickly; Some photos of Cabriolet Road Club that worked the timers in the DA tower for the Nationals and Pomona I will try and name a few Top left to right; It was the 60s --We had one black guy in our club --his name was Willie Scrivens --Willie was LOVED --this is where we all learned that the blood that surged in his veins was the same as ours--at our last reunion you couldn't get close to him as he was constantly being hugged and surrounded by loving members; As promised Here is a extremely rare photo (the only one) made in the early 60s --it was left and forgotten in a closet under some clothes for approx 39-40 years; Allard Chrysler new sponsors July 2013; It's been awhile since we have communicated, hope all is well in your world

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GUEST COLUMNIST: By Jerry Cornelison, from the Road Runners.
   I am attaching a letter I drafted using the ORBA Talking Points mentioned in my previous e-mail. I have modified it a bit and added other pertinent information, including the specific provision of HR1960 as it relates to Johnson Valley (2014 NDAA, Title XXX, Subtitle E, Sections 3051 thru 3054). I offer this for your information to use in total or in part should you choose to contact your Senators or others. I just sent copies to both California Senators Feinstein and Boxer. This is a national bill / issues so letters need to come from all states! Thank you and let's get busy!
Jerry Cornelison Secretary - Road Runners
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The Honorable (Name)
United States Senate
Washington, D.C. 20510
Dear Senator (Name)
   I urge you to support the 2014 NDAA (HR1960), specifically, Title XXX, Subtitle E, Sections 3051 thru 3054, relating to the preservation of the Johnson Valley Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Area (OHV), adjacent to the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms for the following reasons: The Johnson Valley Off-highway Recreation Area represents 1% of the California Desert. There is only 2% of the California desert available for OHV use. If Johnson Valley is lost due to the proposed expansion, 50% of available recreation area in the desert is gone. Others users of this area that will be negatively affected are: Mining Claims; Entertainment/movie industry; Commercial events.
   The proposed Withdrawal of this land from the BLM by the Marine Corps will create the largest Marine Corps Base in the United States, an area larger than the state of Rhode Island. The proposed expansion will only be utilized on a temporary basis; twice a year for maneuvers. It will not be the typical base expansion with permanent troops and facilities.
   Surveys indicate that the revenue loss to the small rural communities surrounding this area will be over $78,000,000. These communities rely on recreation to survive.
   The proposed expansion utilizing Alternative 6* doesn’t adequately address safety concerns, doesn’t fence the area and will not provide for the public safety. Alternative 6 introduces a shared use area; we suspect that when there is an issue with live ordinance use the area will be closed for safety reasons. 
   * (Marine Corps) Alternative 6, would take ownership of nearly 147,000 acres of the adjacent Johnson Valley OHV Recreation Area (a size larger than the city of Chicago). Nearly 104,000 acres of Johnson Valley would be permanently closed to off-roading. Another 43,000 acres, including the unique terrain known as “Hammers,” would initially be available for dual-use (Military and public) purposes. However, this land could be closed in the future since munitions from live-fire training could make the area unsafe for recreational use.
   Congressman Paul Cook, 8th District California (base district), himself a retired Marine Corps Colonel, following several months investigation presented an amendment (HR1676) to the withdrawal. That amendment provides for the area necessary to meet the required training through a BLM permit. The amendment was reviewed by House committees and added to the House 2014 NDAA bill (HR1960 Title XXX, Subtitle E, Sections 3051 thru 3054). This modification and addition to HR1960 is supported by several key agencies and residents: Local Counties and Cities; Residents and Local Businesses; Mining Industry; National and International Business Associations; Users of Johnson Valley OHV Area from around the world; The environmental Community.”
   The Marine Corps has received over 27,000 comments against their withdrawal plan. A White House petition (We the People - Whitehouse.gov) with close to 30,000 signatures has been submitted (awaiting reply).
Sincerely,
(signed)
(US Mail address)
and
(e-mail address if sending by e-mail)

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ASSIGNED STAFF EDITORIAL by Richard Parks: 
   For those of you who have written in with your news, event dates, obituaries, etc, I will do my best to get them in before your event date, but we are a historical newsletter and I cannot guarantee we can publish in time for your event.
   The SLSRH invites all members to contribute editorials and opinions and any views that impact on LSR, straight-line racing and hot rodding will be published. Please make your comments as print ready as possible to ease the work-load of the staff. Put your comments through spell check and make sure that dates, places and names are correct as my time is very limited and I can’t check all details all the time.
   The following comment was sent in by Dyno Don Batyi. “In case you haven't heard, the US Supreme Court has decided not to hear the Ethanol Law suit. Below is a link worth taking a look at. http://autos.aol.com/article/supreme-court-wont-hear-e15-ethanol-fuel-lawsuit/?icid=maing- grid7%7Chtmlws-main-bb%7Cdl9%7Csec1_lnk3%26pLid%3D336117.”
   This is a serious issue. We are being given a choice right now at the pump; 87, 89 and 92 Octane, E-15 and E-30. But soon the government will start to get rid of the non-Ethanol brands and we will be stuck with alcohol additives. This can damage cars without the high-quality fuel set-ups seen in racing cars. Not only does this add expense to hot rod maintenance, but it could seriously damage the engine. As Dyno Don points out, it uses up a lot of corn, which then makes it more expensive for farmers to feed their livestock and pushes up grain and meat prices. The government has an agenda and while that might be good for corn farmers it might also be harmful to those with antique and classic cars, as well as everyday food consumers.

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I thought it was a good idea to catalog and write on the old speed shops though I did ask the shops before to see if they want to do an article.  They are always busy and I did make an effort in getting them to agree on an article.  That is why there was not as much information as provided in the photographs.  I hoped that it would have been more detailed.  I took the photographs on Sunday when the speed shops were closed, except for the wild Irish bar at Molloy's.  The bartender did not know much.  Spencer Simon
     SPENCER: This is a fun project that I would like to see our members start in areas all over the country and in overseas lands as well.  It's a simple but effective way to catalog and learn about our automotive past and doesn't take a lot of research.  Often the speed shop, garage or race track is still in its original place, but the area has changed.  In other cases the building or track has been torn down and replaced with a mall or homes.  The first thing to do is to ask all the old graybeards where they took their girls to the local diners, where the speed shops where located and where they went racing.  Sometimes you can take the old guys with you and they can point the place out.  Take photographs and get the addresses as close as you can to the original addresses.  Then go into the buildings and ask the new owners what they remember.  In many cases they won't remember anything, but maybe they'll remember some person who does remember the old shop, garage, diner or race track. 
     You can also do research by looking at old magazines and racing programs, like our president Jim Miller does.  He collects old magazines and uses the ads to tell him who the owners were, what products they sold and where the place was located.  Then he goes to old maps and locates the street location and compares that with new maps of the area, for roads are sometimes changed over time and relocated.  Not only are their advertisements in these old magazines and newspapers, but actual articles about these favorite places.  Usually all that we can find are a few lines of information.  But using logic and our background knowledge of what we already know, we can begin to put together a story and make a few guesses at what we don't know.
     Some people actually make a living doing this kind of research.  Harold Osmer started out with a research project in college and it ended up being his career.  His project was to find out all the race tracks that existed in Southern California and take a picture of what replaced the race tracks.  He got most of his material from looking in the sports pages of old newspapers at libraries.  Then he went out to the site and took pictures.  He wrote a story based on the newspaper articles and from people he met. Then he took photographs of the area as it looks today.  He published his work and sold the books in museums and at shows.  Using Harold's process we can all do the research in our own areas and regain our automotive and racing history and heritage.  It isn't that hard and it's a lot of fun to do.

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STAFF NOTES: the following comes from www.pricemuseumofspeed.org
   The Price Museum of Speed features a rare display of the greatest representations of early racing history. Many of these rare vintage race cars either won or placed well in numerous renowned events such as the Grand Prix, Le Mans, Morris Park, Briarcliff Cup, Daytona Beach, Gordon Bennett Cup, Empire Track at Yonkers, Sheepshead Bay, Indianapolis, Mille Miglia among others. Also in the collection are other marquee automobiles representing different periods of history. The great representatives of racing history include a 1904 four-cylinder 60 hp Peerless Green Dragon, made famous by Barney Oldfield. The 1907 four-cylinder 35/45 hp Renault Vanderbilt Racer, was made famous by William Vanderbilt Jr., and referred to by some as the Ferrari Enzo of its day. The 1915 four-cylinder 100 hp Weightman Stutz was one of the fastest racers of the period, having a famous Harry Stutz designed engine modeled after the Indianapolis winning Delage Type Y power plant. The 1929 Bugatti 35B Racer, made famous by the French driver Louis Chiron adds to the rarity of the collection. Many of the early racers in the Price Museum of Speed collection were capable of speeds exceeding 100 mph, for extended endurance periods. 
   The capstone of the Price Museum of Speed collection is the famous Ab Jenkins 1938 Mormon Meteor III, considered by sports writers and collectors to be the 4th most important racing machine in the world. The Meteor III was Augie Duesenberg’s automotive capstone, being the last car ever built by him. In 1940 Ab Jenkins held 153 speed records, of which 26 were with the Meteor III set on the Bonneville Salt Flats of Utah. Today 13 records still stand including the grueling 48 hours, set at an average speed of 148 mph. Many trial laps in the Meteor III were done at speeds up to 200 mph, a monumental accomplishment at the time. The Mission of the Price Museum of Speed Foundation is to display unique vintage race cars and memorabilia, and provide an automobile research library for future generations of car enthusiasts to enjoy.

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STAFF NOTES: Evelyn Roth, from www.oilstick.com, sent in the following link.
http://public.fotki.com/SRCruzzin/2013-car-shows-crui/cache-valley-cruise-in/. Evelyn has been a strong supporter of the Mendenhall Gas Pump Museum in Buellton, California and was a volunteer at Black Rock in 1997. 

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Editor’s notes: The following was sent in by Robin Millar and is from material that will go into the program for the Palos Verdes Concours. The research is from Alec Harrell Carlson and Roger H. Harrell, with some comments from Robin. As with all material submitted to the Society of Land Speed Racing Historians it is not checked by the editor. I rely on the writers of the material to be accurate in their research, but as I am a staff of one regarding the text I can’t check all the material sent to me.
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   I was appointed the class manager for the Vintage American Speed cars. This is an article that was written for it. I was wondering if you can help me get these cars for the Palos Verdes Concours. It's September 15, 2013.  I do know and realize that it's the same time as the California Hot Rod Reunion (CHRR) in Bakersfield. Isky said I could use his car. Is there a way I can get hold of Art Chrisman.  Robin Millar
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“Vintage America Speed 1932 to 1952.”  By Alec Harrell Carlson & Roger H. Harrell. Submitted by Robin Millar.
   The Palos Verdes Concours is proud to present a unique class, Vintage American Speed 1932 to 1952, for our 2013 event. This era of vintage American race cars, engines, and racing started with the Land Speed cars of the 1930’s and 1940’s and evolved to include drag racing in the lat 1940’s and early 1950’s. The race cars, engines, and venues co-evolved with racers’ experience and imagination. The Vintage American Speed class features many of the actual land speed and drag cars from the early days.
     Land Speed Racing on the Dry Lakes. Racing at the dry lakes of Southern California, about 100 miles north of Los Angeles, was a pretty haphazard affair in the late 1920s and early 1930s. In the beginning individuals would race what they drove on the streets, most often Model T or A Fords with mild modifications. On a good day, they all raced in the same direction.  Muroc Timing Association was formed and began setting rules and operating with limited and crude timing equipment. Even so, it was still a high-risk affair. After a long day of racing, the 12 fastest cars would line-up and racing all together determine the days’ winner.
     It’s human nature to seek order out of chaos. So, by 1938 the Southern California Timing Association (SCTA) had been formed and safety as well as accurate timing became the order of the day. The SCTA established classes that allowed the race cars to compete with other cars with similar characteristics. However, the standard for a race car was the roadster—racers with coupes and sedans eventually got together and formed the Russetta Timing Association. The SCTA remains the dominant organizer for dry lake racing, and in time recognized coupes and sedans.  In the early years, the SCTA classified race cars as modifieds or roadsters. Modifieds were usually Model T and A Ford roadsters that had been severely shortened, narrowed, lowered etc.—these body types were the predominant style well into the 1930s. The Roadsters were largely Model As and ‘32 Fords—they had to be American production bodies with unaltered height, width and profile.
     The SCTA also established basic rules. First of all, there was a Technical Committee clearing each car before it could run, now known as tech inspection. The rules provided that each car got two qualifying runs to determine which class they would run in that day. Each type (Modified or Roadster) was further grouped into 3 or 4 classes based on qualifying times from earlier in the day.  The goals were safety and efficiency, thus engine power played no part in the class structure through-out the ‘30s. Most of the cars ran Ford or Chevy 4-cylinder engines.
     These 4-cylinder powerplants usually had sophisticated racing equipment as well as internal modifications. For instance, Ford “4-bangers” tended to have after-market over-head valve (OHV) heads by Rajo B, Cragar etc.; while Chevy’s favored Oldsmobile 3-port heads. Many racers experimented with heads and manifolds of their own making—limited only by their own imagination. (By 1938, the most popular engines were 4-cylinder with Cragar or Winfield heads, and V-8 Fords with stock or milled heads.
     In 1938, the SCTA allowed an additional body-type to race at their events—the Streamliner class was now born. The very first Streamliner to run in this class was Bob Rufi’s Modified. He rapidly transformed his Modified roadster into a Streamliner. The next year, Rufi designed and built a true streamliner—by hand, from scratch. He was the first to effectively apply aerodynamics to a race car (pre-made belly-tank bodies came in after WW II). Rufi ran a Chevy 4 with an Olds, 3-port head. He also placed the engine in the rear making it possible for the driver to sit lower in the car rather than above the drive shaft. Rufi debuted his streamliner in late 1939. In 1940, he was running better than 140 mph, and set a Streamliner record that held for about eight years.
     Car number 52 is a typical Modified Ford with a Ford 4-banger running in the early and mid-1930s. Car number 77 is Rufi’s hand-made Streamliner with a Chevy 4 running in 1940. (Streamliners were here to stay. By the late 1940s Modifies will be absorbed into the Streamliner class, but the unmodified Roadster class remains.)  Hot rod engines evolved as well during the pre-war era. Ford came out with their 1932 V-8 engine which obviously ran in the ’32 roadsters but also could be made to fit the much lighter Model T and A based modifieds. Nonetheless, there were still no engine requirements for size or power (cubic inch displacement—cid). Any available American production engine could race against any other. In addition to the Ford V-8, some Modifieds began to carry other engines such as in-line 8-cylinder Hudson’s
     Once racers began to create modifications and accessory equipment to hop-up the V-8 engine, they began to dominate the faster classes. Then in 1940 a class-altering event took place—a record-setting ’32 roadster running its V-8 engine (Vic Edelbrock’s pictured below) was bested by Seccombe’s V-16 Cadillac engine with 452 cid. At that point someone, somewhere must have said: Wow! Engine size matters. Consequently, a new class was created starting in the 1941 season. It was a “big engine” class called Unlimited—making a total of four SCTA classes: Modified, Roadster, Streamliner, and Unlimited. These classes were in place from 1941 through 1946. Tony Capanna’s Modified set a record at better than 145 mph with a V-16 Marmon engine (490 cid) in 1946.
      Nonetheless, after World War II there were still many racers who favored 4-cylinder and V-8 engines. The variance in power produced by this range of engines increasingly allowed some cars to dominant others on a regular basis. As a result, in addition to rules for safety and efficiency, a call for fairness was made. In other words, not every racer wanted to or could buy a huge V-16 engine. Consequently, the class structure once again adapted to the varied preferences of the racers, and it was officially acknowledged that the size of the power plant mattered. By 1948 the SCTA class rules were changed to include four engine displacement categories within two body styles. For example, most 4-cylinder jobs found a home in Class A with fewer than 183 cid.; and most V-16 engines ran in Class D with 350 cid. and up. These distinctions were within two body type classifications: Roadsters and Streamliners (Modifieds were rolled into the Streamliner class.)
     Just as the racers’ actions influenced the class structure, so did the classifications affect the racers. For instance, in 1947 the Spurgin-Giovanine car ran in the B Roadster class and came in fifteenth (thus its number for 1948). They had one of the smallest engines in class B. They responded by destroking their Chevy 4-banger (reducing the number of cid) which put them in Class A for the 1948 season. In Class A, they became the famous record-setting car number 15A. (The restored version of this car was winner in its class at the PV Concours two years ago.)  With such adjustments, some classes come and others go, but Roadsters and V-8s are apparently forever (there are several fine examples at today’s show). For instance, at the July 1951 dry lake meet, Woods & McIver’s C Roadster number 344 had a V-8 ’46 Mercury engine, and Lehmann & Schzwartrock’s B class Roadster was running a ’38 Ford V-8 flathead engine. 
     Additional class adjustments took place in 1949 and throughout the 1950s. Bottom line, by 1950 there were fourteen SCTA classes for dry lake racing.  Part of the reason the SCTA made efforts to include as many varieties of cars and engines as possible was because other forms of racing had been gaining popularity since the mid-1940s: for instance, oval track racing and, most significantly, drag racing. These new venues were viewed by many as more exciting and spectator-friendly as well as less dusty, closer to home, and were weekly events. Drag racing proved to be the most enduring setting for hot rods, and is still flourishing today.
     From the Dry Lakes & Streets to the Drag Strips. A couple of important developments in the post-war years laid the ground-work for organized drag racing. First of all, for many seasoned dry lake racers the challenge of really fast acceleration rather than the top speed attained during a run was exciting. This was evident when the SCTA held its first “Speed Week” at the Bonneville Salt Flats in 1949. They were clocked by how fast they got to the end of the course. This wetted their appetites for acceleration.
     Another important development by the mid-1940s was the explosion of young hot rodders with their street rods. They increasingly didn’t fit-in at the dry lakes for a number of reasons. For instance, by the late 1940s dry lakes racing was getting much faster as after-market equipment got better for V-8 engines and racers increasingly ran nitro-burning engines. This had the effect of keeping many of the street rods off the dry lakes and on the streets. In addition, hot rodding, especially among street-rodders, was becoming a nation-wide phenomenon and dry lake racing was basically a Southern California venue. Every town had two lane streets that were more-or-less suitable for an impromptu drag race.
     Even though many seasoned dry lake racers and street rodders were attracted to drag racing, most of them and most communities were not happy about turning public roads into racing venues. Drag racers needed a safe and efficient place to race. The problem was not insurmountable. Drags were basically only a quarter mile run, and fortunately there were paved abandoned air-strips, often within city limits that met the need. The strips only needed to be about a mile long and have two lanes. For most of the early organizers the point was to find a place for rapid acceleration and to get hot rods off the streets.
     The first organized drag races were held near Santa Barbara, CA in 1949. By June of 1950 the Orange County Drags officially opened on the abandoned runway at the Santa Ana Airport. By the end of the year, officially sanctioned drag racing grew from Southern California until drag strips were a national amateur racing venue with car and engine classifications including afternoon elimination for trophies, and seating for spectators near the starting line and in full view of the mile long race.  In the beginning, there were basically two types of race cars at the drags: the modifieds, roadsters, and coupes from the dry lakes—these dry-lake race cars usually just changed rear tires and gears for short but rapid acceleration. The other type of cars at the drags were street rods running for the fun of it on safe, clocked, paved, spectator friendly drag strips.
     The more seasoned yet amateur drag racers soon began building cars strictly for the drag strips. Some of these hot rodders, such as the pair pictured below, had run 4-cylinder engines in their modifieds during the ‘30s, and V-8 flathead Ford engines as early as 1940 at the dry lakes. When they became drag racers in 1950 they took their flathead V-8s (modified for rapid acceleration) and put them in roadsters built for the drag strips. By then they had high quality racing heads and intake manifolds available from several producers (the racers pictured below happen to be running Harrell heads and intake manifold). Once the external equipment had been perfected, the racers committed to V-8 flatheads continued to experiment with size of bore and stroke (cid), and cam grinds well into the mid-1950s.
     In addition to seasoned dry lake racers, seasoned street racers also found a home at the new drag strips. Dick Kraft was racing around the streets in his V-8 flathead (286 cid. and Evans heads) until the Santa Ana drag strip opened in 1950. Kraft was one of first to leave the streets and race legally on a paved surface for a mile. In September 1950 he turned 109 mph at Santa Ana Drags in his “Bug.”  Less flamboyant street rodders also found a comfortable home at the new drag strips. They could drive to the near-by strip just about any weekend and have a good, relatively safe and legal race. Most of these street rods were built by young people who used them as daily drivers, but wanted them to look, feel, and go better than stock. Without going inside the engine, this was normally achieved at a relatively low cost by adding external racing equipment such as high compression heads and dual or triple intake manifolds which were readily available from manufacturers such as Edelbrock, Offenhauser, Sharp, Meyers, Navarro, Harrell, Evans, etc.  Once again order was the order-of-day. Racers with organizational skills stepped up to bring safety, efficiency, and fairness into the new drag racing venue.      National Hot Rod Association (NHRA).  The rapidly growing drag racing community needed and got the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). Basically, the association’s goal was to establish some rules and civilize the still amateur sport. In April of 1953 the NHRA sanctioned its first race at Pomona Drag Strip near Los Angeles. The event drew some 375 cars and more than 16,000 spectators. By 1955, the NHRA held its first annual, national “run-off” known as the Nationals.  With safety and efficiency rules in place, features such as roll bars and helmets began to appear. During the first half of the 1950s full-race flathead Ford engines continued to take honors and attract crowds at the drag strips. The following photo shows a roadster with a flathead V-8 at the starting line generating power and excitement at Santa Ana in early 1950s. 
     Recall, the Ford V-8 flathead era began in the late 1930s and dominated the lakes, tracks, and drag strips well into the 1950s. However, the beginning of the end for flatheads in competition drag racing was evident by 1949 when Oldsmobile and Cadillac started marketing overhead valve (OHV) V-8 engines in their production cars that matched many of the hoped up Ford flatheads in power. By 1951, the Chrysler OHV Hemi-engines clearly had the power to eclipse Ford’s V-8 flathead. Many racers felt flatheads would no longer be competitive, no matter how ingeniously hoped up and equipped.
   However, a last-ditched effort to save the racing life of flatheads was to design OHV systems for the Ford flathead engine blocks. Several individuals designed and built OHV systems for the flatheads but the most popular conversions for Ford flatheads was the Ardun. Once the “bugs” were exterminated, some racers thought the Ardun heads were competitive with Chrysler’s hemi-engines.  Not the fastest, but still desired and never to be forgotten are the beautiful Ford flathead powered roadsters—several of which are here today.
     There is no better way to wrap-up this introduction to vintage race cars from the early 1930s to the early 1950s than to feature a Modified Roadster/Dragster that spanned the entire period with several different owners and all the major engine types. At the dry lakes this Modified carried a 4-cylinder Ford engine in the 1930s; then V-8 flathead Ford engines in the 1940s; then a flathead V-8 fitted with an Ardun OHV system; and finally, as Art Chrisman’s number 25 Dragster the car had a Chrysler Hemi engine inserted to run at the Santa Ana Drag Strip in the early 1950s. (This car is pictured in its Modified state above as # 69 in 1941).

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Some of you have been there, some may never make time, but all will marvel at this American cradle of speed and beauty.  Take a few moments to wander the wild side.  A finer speedway can’t be found anywhere on earth.  And when the mechanical circus sets-up, yowza!  Such an eye, ear, and heart full of unstressful vistas.  Don’t view on your phone, go find as big a monitor as you can; really!  http://www.utah3d.net/utah-travel/bonneville-salt-flats/salt-flats-night.html#.UdrpQQzAcrk.skyrock, or http://www.utah3d.net/utah-travel/bonneville-salt-flats/salt-flats-1.html.  Speedy Regards, "LandSpeed" Louise Ann Noeth

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I saw that you had linked to AutoHistory.org in the past and wanted to reach out to you  with an infographic my team is promoting this week on the history of the automotive  industry. I thought your readers might enjoy a visual follow-up post. I would really appreciate if  you could share this on your blog and can send visitors directly to this post. Thanks, Aria Cahill
   ARIA: I have posted the SAH statement of purpose and I have been a past member of the Southern California Chapter.  It is a fine organization. Any correspondence received which has factual material on the car culture is published in our newsletter and we will post your comments as well. 

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STAFF NOTES: the following comes from the SAH website, courtesy of Aria Cahill.
   The Society of Automotive Historians was founded in Hershey Pennsylvania in 1969. We are an international organization with over 900 members scattered across the globe. The Society is an eclectic but serious community of historians that includes academic scholars, automotive journalists and publishers, museum and library professionals, educational and cultural organizations, car collectors and restorers, and enthusiasts.
   Our membership encourages research into any aspect of automotive history. We actively support the compilation and preservation of papers, organizational records, print ephemera and images to safeguard, broaden and deepen the understanding of motorized, wheeled land transportation through the modern age and into the future.
   To reveal this history, we promote the publishing of research findings in books, journals and conference papers. We support the efforts of educators to teach college level academic courses and those who introduce K-12 students to the panorama of automotive history.
   For all members, the SAH provides camaraderie and the exchange of ideas, knowledge and data. The Society's roster allows members to connect with others who have similar specialized interests.
   All members receive the Society's three publications. The bimonthly SAH Journal carries news of the SAH and its members along with short feature articles, book and video reviews, plus classified advertisements.  The semianual magazine Automotive History Review publishes in-depth articles on automotive history, most of them based on original, independent research.  And the  online Membership Directory includes extensive indexes and cross-referencing so that members can match mutual interests and communicate on automotive topics around the world.
   Each year, the Society recognizes significant contributions to the publishing, documentation, and preservation of the worldwide history of the motor vehicle. There are awards for publishing in print (books, articles and magazines) and non-print media (film, video, audio, websites, etc.). Additionally, awards are made for papers authored by undergraduate- and graduate-level students at educational institutions. Service awards are presented for the preservation of archives and for exemplary service to the cause of automotive history. Nominations are received in the spring of each year and awards are presented at the Society's annual meeting, held during October.
The Nicholas-Joseph Cugnot Award
The Carl Benz Award
Richard and Grace Brigham Award
E. P. Ingersoll Award
James J. Bradley Distinguished Service Award
Friend of Automotive History
Student Paper Award
   The SAH encourages members to participate in programs associated with automotive history, such as conferences on industry topics, locating or identifying repositories of company records and personal papers of historical figures, and preserving and providing access to historical materials. The Society holds its annual meeting in conjunction with the Antique Automobile Club of America's National Fall Meet in Hershey, Pennsylvania each October. More than 100 people traditionally attend the Friday night buffet and awards presentation. The SAH also maintains a Hospitality Tent for members and guests on the Hershey flea market fields each year, Thursday through Saturday.
   A standard one-year membership is $40.  A standard one-year  student membership is $20.  A secondary source is its annual silent auction of automotive books and literature, conducted by mail. Because the SAH is a not-for-profit corporation, it is recognized by the United States Internal Revenue Service as a charitable and educational organization. Monetary contributions are deductible to the extent provided by law. Contributions are applied toward the cost of publications and awards.

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I wanted to pass on the following Facebook link for you to check out and hopefully place on your "watch" list. The car shown is a very historic 36hp engine powered 1955 Volkswagen bug that has been driven "around the world" on three different documented occasions and will be driven from northeast Canada to Bonneville this year to race in the 36hp Challenge at the USFRA's World of Speed. The man behind this challenge is Emmanuel "Manu" Thuillier along with a lot of supporting friends and family. Follow Manu and his progress with the construction of the engine and his journey west. The link can be found here:  http://www.facebook.com/groups/193912417434911
1045113_4873298839652_1375971862_n[1] - Copy
Enjoy the Spirit of the Competition as Manu and crew will be doing this September. Burly Burlile

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You might be interested in this Society http://www.facebook.com/pages/Drag-Racing-Memorabilia-Society-of-America/382747922717.  John Hutchinson
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Santa Pod Raceway News - 03/07/2013. Dragstalgia Header Dragstalgia 2013 Saturday 13th - Sunday 14th July. Advanced Ticket Deadline: You are running out of time to save 's by booking your tickets for Dragstalgia in advance. Tickets are available up to 5:00pm on Friday 5th July, any tickets bought after then will be at the standard rate with the 'print at home' option only or you can purchase your ticket on arrival. Don't miss out, book now via eticketing.co.uk/santapodraceway.  Dragstalgia is an event where Santa Pod goes back to the way we were, a weekend dedicated to drag racing, hot rods and bikes from a bygone era with classic dragsters and funny cars, altereds, hot rods, American muscle and more. There will be Championship Drag Racing and Run What Ya Brung sessions (pre entry only) on the track along with the Fireforce Jet Car and 2 seater Dragster Rides. Off track there will be Show & Shine, Live Music, Traders, Cacklefest, Historic Car Display and more. John Hutchinson

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Aussie Invader July 2013 Newsletter, from Roscoe McGlashon.
   G’day and welcome to our July 2013 newsletter which goes out to all of our dedicated followers, fans and supporters and a real big thank you to our 1000 MPH Club members and loyal sponsors. Without you we would not have been able to achieve a major milestone this month by covering the costs incurred for machining and balancing of our Calm Aluminium tireless wheels.  Aussie Invader team hitting it on all fronts This past month has been very busy as there are so many areas that demand attention on this project to keep us surging ahead. As the team leader sometimes I struggle to find enough hours in a day to stay on top of it all, but with help I do. My loyal team are doing the same and our technical gurus Mike Annear, Mark Read and Alex Blain push ahead with the jobs they have to get done and sometimes without my direct input, but delegation is essential if we are going to succeed in our quest to break the World Land Speed Record. To prove the point, my right hand man Pete Taylor looked at my email list and said “mate why don’t you put those 1800 emails in folders.” I showed him my folder list and told him that these 1800 emails are just the current ones I am working on, when I have finished with them I can then put them in folders, he just smiled. 
   After a team meeting early in the month we decided that we needed to get as much of the car painted as possible, so our sponsors and 1000 MPH Club members could be recognised for their fantastic contribution. We asked one of Australia’s most renowned panel and paint specialists Parins if they would take on the job of painting our 16 metre long monster. These guys originally painted both our previous LSR cars Aussie Invader 2 & 3, with both of these cars still looking like they were painted yesterday, well apart the fact that Aussie Invader 2 that suffered a high speed collision and was totaled, but she still looks pretty to me.  After a brief conversation about paint, David Parins said OK, let’s get started.” We dropped off 30 aluminium panels that needed etch priming and painting and they were all professionally painted in under a week, thank you David, Dominic and the entire Parins Team. It is great to work with first class people who do a first class job. A big thank you also goes out to Brad Curtis and PPG Industries for their great paint products.  
   After months of discussion, we have secured our second International partner/sponsor. This companies profile and products are ideally matched with the high quality and precision we require in building our car and needed to break the current World Land Speed Record. More on this very soon when we make an official announcement. Driver roll-cage gets finishing touches Brad Stacy our local race car engineer and TIG welding genius has just spent the last few weeks performing a final fit-out on our drivers roll-cage and mounting our on-board safety equipment including our seat, seatbelts, air breathing system, fire system, brake master and flooring. As soon as we have the cage painted it will be refitted into our chassis and fully welded in place.
   Progress with the mounting of our rocket engine Ivan the Terrible one of our dedicated crew members has been very busy making up our engine mounting lugs. We have had some great input from the Centre of Hypersonics (University of Queensland) team headed by Stefan Brieschenk with some of the specs for the thrust rods that take the full 62k lbf load from our rocket motor and transfer it into the chassis. The rod ends that need to take this load proved a real show-stopper to locate here in Australia. We have had previous success with past race cars using Aurora Bearings, so a call was placed to Aurora Bearings engineering department in the US. John McCrory their Racecar Product Manager and Chris Irvin looked into our requirements in Land Speed Record time and suggested the product that will do the job, giving us enough gimbal angle to adjust our motors nozzle alignment and offering us a safety rating of 4-1. Their great product is currently heading towards Western Australia.
   To be able to access our rocket motor components, it was necessary to add two round access holes to the rear sides of our mainframe. We decided to cut these hatches using a plasma torch and complete the job with a line boring operation. Joe from S.O.S. (Steinmeier Oxy Services) Welding Supply in Bayswater is an old mate and when I asked him if we could borrow a brand new machine with all the safety product for the team thrown in, he was at our shop in a heartbeat. The job was first class as always and Joe you are a real trooper. We are going to make composite plugs for these holes and decided we should go with a really fine finish and matching od’s for these portholes. I called up another old mate who is regarded as the best line borer in our state to come and take a look at what we were after, "no problem" he said I’ll be back tomorrow and get the job done. True to his word he arrived and got to work making our access holes perfectly round a mirror image on both sides of our car. Ray Freeman from Portable Line borers you are a legend.  Roscoe McGlasson

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THE BACK FENCE MOB. By Le Roi Tex Smith 
   If you want to see the very heart and soul of street rodding, go straight from the entrance gate to the event back fence. Yep, way back there away from all the cruising and the power parking and the posing. Back among the peasant life, the unwashed masses, the very core of American hot rodding. That’s where you’ll find the real media professionals, those members of the press who make their livings by getting to the core of everything automotive. You’ll like the atmosphere. 
   It’s always interesting to note who shun the obvious spotlight of rod runs, particularly the “Big Ones”. These are the people who do not need the adoring crowds falling all over themselves to fawn over the latest gee-gaw or whizz-bang. While those amongst us who must make a living playing to the throngs realize the need to see and be seen, it is still remarkable how many of the stellar gravitate to the more calm waters of reason. That is, most of the so called Big Names of hot rodding prefer to let their performances do the talking. Sounds a lot like a champion athlete, doesn’t it? 
   In wheel-to-wheel competition, the results are objective. He who gets there first wins. In street rodding, it is much more subjective. Here it is more about who gets the most notoriety, and that translates to more work in the shop, more product sold, more bankable assets at day’s end, more ego salve for the rodder customer. Yet even with this dichotomy, there is a kind of back fence to the hot rod building business. The country is overflowing with some really outstanding commercial rod builders who seem to get practically no national publicity. But at those national rod runs where the pro’s gather out of the limelight for a breather, those lesser known rod shop individuals are readily recognized and appreciated. Back at the front gate, meanwhile, the wannabe’s are clamoring for the best seats (their lawn chairs) in the streets. Near the main intersection or entrance to the biggest exhibit hall.

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STAFF NOTES: the following email comes from Jessica Clark who is attempting to make a career in stock car racing.
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   The month of June was a busy one. The weekend prior to making our way out to Utah, we took the car to Burbank for an awesome car show hosted by the Road Kings of Burbank. We had a nice little spot in the shade by some vintage drag cars and a land speed record holder. It was so nice having my car on display at this show, and it spiked a lot of interest from the show’s attendees. It was a blast answering everyone’s questions about myself as a driver and the Lucas Oil Modified Series. I have to send out my thanks to Ed Drogmund and the Road Kings of Burbank for inviting me to their show. 
   Four days later, after my dad, cousin Tyler, and I went for a 3 AM jog, we set out for a 14 hour drive to Utah. Except for the lack of air conditioning in our truck, the ride out to Utah wasn’t too bad. We had good company and the smiles never left our faces, not even when we passed through St. George and our thermometer reached 111 degrees. We arrived in Utah on Thursday night, so we were able to get a fair amount of rest before practice on Friday. The first and only time I raced at Rocky Mountain Raceway (RMR) was two years ago in a Ford Focus Midget. I remember loving how fast the 3/8 mile track was, and I was excited to race my Modified on it. Saturday morning I woke up knowing I had my work cut out for me. 
   Numerous champions have been drawn to the Lucas Oil Modified Series this season making it extremely competitive. At least 12 drivers are capable of winning on any given night. In addition to the regular series competitors, we were also going to be racing the local RMR modified drivers with years of experience at their home track. I didn’t doubt my talent as a driver, but I did know that I had the smallest motor out there, which was going to make it very difficult to qualify into the “A” main. 36 cars drove to qualify into the 26 car “A” main event. The top 18 automatically transferred into the “A” main - I qualified 19th.  My time was .003 second slower than 18th. Luckily, I did not have to race in the “B” main event because of my points standing within the series. I was given a “provisional,” which allowed me to go straight into the A main - but I had to start in the last row. 
   Prior to heading out for the “A” main I think we were all a little bit nervous, so my cousin decided to crank up our music. Before we knew it Tyler, my dad, my mom, and I were all dancing around in the trailer. This helped us calm down and loosen up before the race. We didn’t make the long haul out to Utah for nothing. I started the 75 lap main event with a solid plan to watch out for wrecks during the first 20 laps, start picking through the field for the next 30 laps, and then run the car as hard as possible for the last 25 laps. But -- on the first lap, the only person behind me decided he wasn’t going to hold back his aggression. My dad, who was my spotter, called him inside, and I gave him more than enough room below me on the track. I was extremely surprised to find him running straight into my left rear tire when I had given him so much room.
   The hit bent in my left rear wheel and caused the tire to go flat. I made sure I stayed on the track to get the yellow flag out, and then I hobbled my car off the track. My team was ready with a new left rear tire for me, and they got me back out on the lead lap. We were one lap in, and I had already been involved in a wreck. Ugh! The first 20 laps held three more wrecks, two of which happened right in front of me, and the third one collected me, which ultimately sent me to the back of the field -again. By lap 30 I was tired of the petty crashes so I became determined to run down my competitors. 
   I made pass after pass while my dad flawlessly spotted for me. By lap 75, I was running down the 11th and 12th place cars when the checkered flag came out, so I had to settle for a 13th place finish. I’m proud of my passing skills during the race because instead of methodically setting up a pass, I simply placed the car where it needed to be and went for it. In other words, for the first time, I didn’t waste laps, which ultimately helped me move through the field more efficiently. Next up is Madera on July 20th. Madera is a 1/4 mile track so our motor will be perfect, and I am expecting some good results.  Jessica Clark info@jessicaclarkracing.com

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STAFF NOTES: the following was sent to us by Jeff DeMarey.
   Antique Auto Hill Climb July 13, 2013 on Wilbraham Mountain, Wilbraham, MA. As part of the Town of Wilbraham’s 250th Anniversary celebration (1763-2013), the Wilbraham Hill Climb Reenactment Committee will stage a reenactment of the town’s 1908 automobile Hill Climb on Saturday, July 13, 2013 from 9 am until 3 pm at Monson Road and all along Main Street.  Come see a bunch of car crazy people climb a 1 mile long 23% grade then turnaround and come down. Engines screaming and brakes begging for mercy.     Jeff DeMarey
   Union News Article; http://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2013/07/wilbraham_hill_climb_reenactme.html. Face Book  https://www.facebook.com/WibrahamHillCimb#!/WibrahamHillCimb           Jeffrey DeMarey, President   Stonewall Insurance Group Inc  Home, Aviation, Collector Car, Personal Umbrella, Auto, Yacht & Business  www.stonewallinsurancegroup.com  Mailing address  40 Post Office Park, Box 207 Wilbraham, MA 01095-0207.                 2013 Commemorative Reenactment of the 1908 Hill Climb Celebrating the 250th Anniversary of the Town of Wilbraham.  In the year 1905, there were 1700 people living in Wilbraham and only one car was registered. By the town’s 150th birthday (1913), there were 2,400 residents and between 30 and 40 cars were driving Wilbraham roadways. By 1963, the town’s 200th birthday, there were 8,000 residents and 5,200 cars in town.    
   The one and only car registered in 1905 in Wilbraham belonged to Henry Willis Cutler carrying a value of $500. This 1905 Knox Touring car had Massachusetts registered plate number 570. That plate number remained with every Cutler-owned car for the next 58 years-up to the town’s 200th birthday. The North Wilbraham H.W. Cutler Company-1844: arrived in Wilbraham in 1877-milled and mixed feed and grain and sold farm supplies in several retail area stores)    
   The 1908 “H” Sportabout Knox sold for $2,500 and the “L” Tonneau sold for $2,700. In that same year, on Friday, September 11, 1908 the Springfield Automobile Club sponsored by the Massachusetts Automobile Club of Massachusetts, ran one of the earliest hill climbing contests of New England on Wilbraham Mountain. An original road sign commemorating that event is in the lobby at the Wilbraham Town Hall 240 Main Street. A replica will be at Monson Road during the Hill Climb event.    
   Seventy machines competed in 20 separate events climbing the steep one mile dirt course along Monson Road. The starting line was 500 feet east of Main Street and the finish line was about 900 feet west of Ridge Road.  Finishing first in Event 16, was the 48.8 horsepower Knox Giant driven by Charles Basle (1 minute 8 seconds) and winner of the silver cup. Basle was born in France and had been racing for five years. The 38.8 horsepower Knox Racer driven by Billy Bourque finished second in the contest at 20 seconds behind Basle. Bourque was born in Springfield, Mass. and had been racing for ten years. In Event 13, the Stevens- Duryea driven by Pete Robinson (1 minute, 10 seconds), also a Springfield-made car expertly negotiated the 23 percent grade, before an estimated crowd of 5,000 spectators.    
   Stanley Kellogg driving a 7 horsepower Indian Motorcycle –also made in Springfield, Mass. won the heat in that class at 1 minute, 3/5 seconds. Motorcycle events ran under the rules and with the sanction of the Federation of American Motorcycles.  History of Wilbraham, by Charles L. Merrick (1963) pp.117-118 University of Massachusetts Lowell Center for Lowell History- library.uml.edu/clh/Aut03.htm.   1908 Events in the United States- www.teamdan.com/archive/gen/indycar/1908.html. Cached  Margaret Humberston, Head of Library & Archives, Wood Museum of Springfield History        Researched by Joan Paris 11/26/2012.                
   1908 Events in the United States  11th September - Wilbraham Hill, Springfield, MA. 1 mile hill climb 
FP#   Driver               Car                         Time 
Cars, 40.1 to 60 hp  
1    Peter Robinson       Stevens-Duryea 56-6       0:01:10.2, 51.3 mph    
Cars, 24.1 to 40 hp  
1    S.H. Hancock          Stevens-Duryea 36         0:01:22.6, 43.6 mph  
2    Al Denison        Knox 30                       0:01:35.4  
3    Bob Burman       Buick 34                      0:01:35.6  
4    Harry Ormsdorf       Chalmers-Detroit 40        0:01:35.8  
5    William Bourque      Knox 38                       0:01:37.6  
6    Bailey                  Bailey                          0:02:26.2    
Cars, 15.1-24 hp  
1    Bob Burman       Buick 16                       0:02:14.6, 26.75 mph  
2    F.F. Cameron          Cameron 22                  0:02:15.2    
Cars, $850 and under  
1    F.F. Cameron          Cameron 22                  0:02:24.6, 24.90 mph  
2    Walter Smith           Middleby                     0:05:17.2    
Cars, $851-$1250  
1    Bob Burman        Buick 22                      0:02:12.8, 27.11 mph  
2    F.F. Cameron           Cameron 22                  0:02:17.0  
3    Walter Smith           Middleby                     0:03:41.8    
Cars, $1251-$2000  
1    E. P. Blake         Jackson 24                      0:02:01.8, 29.56 mph  
2    F. F. Cameron           Cameron 24                  0:02:13.2    
Cars, $2001-$3000  
1    William Bourque       Knox 38                       0:01:26.6, 41.57 mph  
2    Al Denison         Knox 30                       0:01:35.4  
3    Harry Ormdorf         Chalmers-Detroit 40        0:01:47.4  
4    Bailey                   Bailey                         0:02:25.4    
Cars, $3001-$4000  
1    S. H. Hancock          Stevens-Duryea 36         0:01:23.4, 43.16 mph    
Cars, over $4000  
1    Peter Robinson        Stevens-Duryea 54         0:01:10.0, 51.43 mph    
Cars, under 50 sq in piston area  
1    Ruggles                 Atlas 34                       0:02:34.6, 23.29 mph  
2    Bailey                   Bailey                          0:04:00.4    
Cars, 50-65 sq in piston area  
1    Al Denison         Knox 30                       0:01:40.0, 36.00 mph  
2    F.F. Cameron           Cameron                       0:02:11.4  
3    Bob Burman        Buick                           0:02:12.4  
4    Bailey                   Bailey                          0:02:40.0    
Cars, 65-90 sq in piston area  
1    S.H. Hancock           Stevens-Duryea 36          0:01:18.6, 45.80 mph  
2    William Bourque       Knox 38                       0:01:28.0    
Cars, over 90 sq in piston area  
1    Peter Robinson        Stevens-Duryea 54          0:01:09.8, 51.58 mph    
Free-Formula, Gas Vehicles  
1    Charles Basle          Knox 48                       0:01:08.0, 52.94 mph  
2    William Bourque       Knox 38                        0:01:09.8  
3    S.H. Hancock           Stevens-Duryea 36          0:01:16.2    
Free-Formula, Gas Stock Vehicles  
1    S.H. Hancock           Stevens-Duryea 36          0:01:22.0, 43.90 mph  
2    Al Denison         Knox 30                       0:01:36.6    
Free-Formula, Record Trials  
1    Al Denison         Knox 30                       0:01:09.6, 51.72 mph  
2    Leo Baldwin            Stanley Steamer            0:01:11.4  
3    Charles Basle          Knox 48                       0:01:12.0  
                     ------------------------------
In 1908, headlines from all over read: “Stiff Climb for 72 Cars Entered in Wilbraham Run.” “Steepness of Grade Will Make Contest Best Test of Cars' Power of any Climb of the Season.” “Wilbraham Hill Showing 23% Grade.”
   The 1908 Hill Climb event was put on by the Automobile Club of Springfield and sanctioned by the racing board of the American Automobile Association. The cars were timed over a measured mile by the Timing Club of New York City.
   The 72 car field was broken down into 21 classes for engine type, displacement and price. There was also a modified class, as well as classes for motorcycles. This was a major event for the Springfield area with the plethora of automobile and motorcycle manufacturers in the area (Wilbraham Mountain was an unofficial proving ground for many automobile manufacturers).
   In the year 1905, there were 1700 people living in Wilbraham and only one car was registered. By the town’s 150th birthday (1913), there were 2,400 residents and between 30 and 40 cars were driving Wilbraham roadways. By 1963, the town’s 200th birthday, there were 8,000 residents and 5,200 cars in town.
   The one and only car registered in 1905 in Wilbraham belonged to Henry Willis Cutler carrying a value of $500. This 1905 Knox Touring car had Massachusetts registered plate number 570. That plate number remained with every Cutler-owned car for the next 58 years-up to the town’s 200th birthday. (The North Wilbraham H.W. Cutler Company-1844: arrived in Wilbraham in 1877-milled and mixed feed and grain and sold farm supplies in several retail area stores).
   The 1908 “H” Sportabout Knox sold for $2,500 and the “L” Tonneau sold for $2,700. In that same year, on Friday, September 11, 1908 the Springfield Automobile Club sponsored by the Massachusetts Automobile Club of Massachusetts, ran one of the earliest hill climbing contests of New England on Wilbraham Mountain. An original road sign commemorating that event is in the lobby at the Wilbraham Town Hall 240 Main Street. A replica will be at Monson Road during the Hill Climb event.
   Seventy machines competed in 20 separate events climbing the steep one mile dirt course along Monson Road. The starting line was 500 feet east of Main Street and the finish line was about 900 feet west of Ridge Road.
   Finishing first in Event 16, was the 48.8 horsepower Knox Giant driven by Charles Basle (1 minute 8 seconds) and winner of the silver cup. Basle was born in France and had been racing for five years.
   The 38.8 horsepower Knox Racer driven by Billy Bourque finished second in the contest at 20 seconds behind Basle. Bourque was born in Springfield, Mass. and had been racing for ten years.
   In Event 13, the Stevens- Duryea driven by Pete Robinson (1 minute, 10 seconds), also a Springfield-made car expertly negotiated the 23 percent grade, before an estimated crowd of 5,000 spectators.
   Stanley Kellogg driving a 7 horsepower Indian Motorcycle –also made in Springfield, Mass. won the heat in that class at (1 minute, 3/5 seconds). Motorcycle events ran under the rules and with the sanction of the Federation of American Motorcycles.
   From 1777 until its closing during the Vietnam War, the Springfield Armory attracted skilled laborers to Springfield, making it the United States' longtime epicenter for precision manufacturing.
   Springfield produced many of America's most significant innovations, including:
The first use of interchangeable parts and the assembly line in manufacturing (1819, Thomas Blanchard). The first American horseless car (1825, Thomas Blanchard). The discovery and patent of vulcanized rubber (1844, Charles Goodyear). The first American gasoline-powered car (1893, Duryea Brothers). The first successful motorcycle company (1901, "Indian" Motorcycle). We think of it now as an old industrial city-But in 1920 it was the cutting edge.
   Springfield, then the center of the nation's gun industry, caught the eye of Rolls-Royce because of its leadership in the precision machine and automotive industry, as well as its proximity to New York and Boston. Frederick Henry Royce was the quintessential engineer. Charles Stewart Rolls, who was the classic salesman.
   By definition an automobile or car is a wheeled vehicle that carries its own motor and transports passengers. The automobile as we know it was not invented in a single day by a single inventor. The history of the automobile reflects an evolution that took place worldwide. The object of Rolls-Royce was to build a car that would last a lifetime, not a decade.  Springfield, Mass - The New England city where the American automobile industry was born in 1895 became an outpost of British craftsmanship and luxury when Rolls-Royce opened an assembly plant in 1921.
   It was the first and only outside Britain for the company. The Springfield plant assembled 1,703 Silver Ghosts and 1,241 Phantoms, and more than half are still in existence. Were you to walk into a Rolls-Royce showroom in those days, be it in London or New York, you would buy nothing more than a chassis with an engine, steering column, and wheels. No body, no seats, no accessories. And it wasn’t cheap. You’d be plunking down about $10,000. The Depression wiped out the U.S. market for a car that then sold for more than 12,000, the price of a big house at a time when a fancy Packard went for $3,500.
   The Springfield plant closed in 1931. Today it is the home of Titeflex, which makes specialized hoses for the space and aviation industry. (Off 91 Interstate). Royce settled on a factory in Springfield, Massachusetts, formerly home to the American Wire Wheel Company. Springfield made great sense from a business standpoint, as the region was filled with skilled machinists and metal workers who had learned their trade in the armories and factories along the Connecticut River from Vermont to Long Island Sound. The region, famed for producing everything from Columbia bicycles to Colt revolvers, from Royal typewriters to Winchester repeaters, was the Silicon Valley of its day.
   Springfield was also equidistant between Rolls’ two largest markets: Boston and New York City. The American Wire Wheel factory sat alongside a rail line, making it an ideal site for shipping chassis to coachbuilders. Back at the turn of the 20th Century, there were dozens of American coach building companies, each of which was eager to build you a body for whatever frame you had purchased.
   In 1925, the Springfield manufacturing facility made significant changes in the cars they were producing. Unlike their British cousins, their engines now featured valve covers. They adopted the use of drum headlights, sturdy American electrical components, and tubular bumpers. But the most radical development was creating a car with the steering wheel on the left. Even the mighty Rolls Royce, which had stubbornly resisted the move for four years, would finally bow to American tastes.
   On December 12, 1919, L.J. Belnap of Montreal, President of the newly formed Rolls-Royce of America Inc., announced the purchase of the former plant of the Wire Wheel Company plant in Springfield, Massachusetts as a location for the American branch of the British automobile concern. The plant compromised seven buildings and covered seven acres. Rolls-Royce of America optimistically announced that they were planning on hiring 1,000 hands within the following year.
   It had long been the policy of Rolls-Royce Ltd’s advertising to concentrate on the chassis alone and leave the advertising of the coachwork to the independent coachbuilders. Rolls-Royce’s authorized sales agents would typically work with a specific coachbuilder, or group of builders, who could supply them with completed bodies depending on the requirements of the customer.
   Unfortunately that tradition wouldn’t work in the United States as by 1920, most American luxury car buyers had become accustomed to purchasing a complete vehicle. In order to effectively compete with the competition - Packard, Pierce-Arrow and Cadillac - Rolls-Royce of America introduced a series of semi-custom bodies that would be available under the Rolls-Royce Custom Coachwork program.
   Luckily, the Springfield works were located in the virtual center of the country’s custom coach building industry, and by the time the first finished chassis were completed in February 1921, arrangements had been made with a handful of them to supply the plant with bodies in-the-white. In-the-white refers to bodies delivered to a chassis manufacturer minus trim, paint, varnish and hardware.
   Early bodies were supplied by the New Haven Carriage Co. of New Haven, Connecticut and the Smith-Springfield Body Co. of West Springfield, Mass. They all bore Rolls-Royce Custom Coach Work plates affixed to cowl at the lower right front corner. RRCCW-badged bodies were constructed to standard designs by the following firms: Amesbury Body Co., Amesbury, Mass. (aka Amesbury Body)
Biddle & Smart Co., Amesbury, Mass.
Holbrook Co, Hudson, N.Y.*
Locke Co., New York, NY*
Merrimac Body Co., Merrimac, Mass.
New Haven Carriage Co., New Haven, Conn.
Smith-Springfield Body Co., West Springfield, Mass.
Springfield Body Corp., Springfield, Mass. (aka Springfield Body Works)
Springfield Coach Works, Springfield & Chicopee, Mass.
Willoughby & Co., Utica , N.Y.*
   Springfield is where brothers Charles and Frank Duryea launched America's first mass-produced, gasoline-powered automobile in 1893. The next year, according to tradition, Frank Duryea met Rolls-Royce co-founder Henry Royce when he took his car to England for the first Brighton-to-London race. Duryea took Royce for a spin in the racer that finished more than an hour ahead of the British competition. By 1896, the Duryea Motor Wagon Company had sold thirteen models of the Duryea, an expensive limousine, which remained in production into the 1920s.
   At the same time, the Knox Company was specializing in big machines. The Knox Automobile Company was a manufacturer of automobiles in Springfield, Massachusetts, United States between 1900 and 1914. Knox also built trucks and farm tractors until 1924. Harry Knox developed an air-cooled, tiller steered, three-wheel automobile in 1899 and founded the pioneering Knox Automobile Company. The third car made by the company was owned by Springfield resident Everett Barney, who later donated his large estate to the city of Springfield for the creation of Forest Park. Knox also played a role in the development of motorized fire vehicles, police patrol cars, taxi cabs, trucks, and tractors. Knox Automobile was one of the big winners of the competition. The cup was donated by Mrs. Robert Avery whose late father, John Collins worked for the Knox Company near Wilbraham Road and the railroad crossing. 
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   Wilbraham MA- As part of the Town of Wilbraham’s 250th Anniversary celebration (1763-2013), the Wilbraham Hill Climb Reenactment Committee will stage a reenactment of the town’s 1908 automobile Hill Climb on Saturday, July 13, 2013 at from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. at Monson Road and all along Main Street. Spectators are required to bring their own seats. Admission to the event is free and open to the public. There is a $4 parking fee at the Grandstand viewing area at Green Meadows Farm on 182 Monson Road-with access to parking there starting at 8 a.m. and- then only once an hour on the hour. Participating vehicles, by invitation only, will be pre- World War II and pre- World War I cars driven by members of the Vintage Sports Car Club of America (VSCCA), out of Lime Rock Connecticut who have participated in similar hill climbs across the country.
   A commemorative booklet will reveal how our local economy was impacted and convey a general theme of early transportation in the Pioneer Valley. Monson Road will open from Main Street to Ridge road on the hour every hour to allow grandstand parking. There is no on street parking available anywhere during the event. Free spectator parking will be available at Mile Tree School at 621Main Street, at Wilbraham & Monson Academy at 423 Main Street( in their Faculty Street parking lot), and at the Wilbraham United Church at 500 Main Street. The Wilbraham Senior Center van will shuttle spectators up and down Main Street from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m.
   Through the generosity of Peter and Melissa Picknelly, the Peter Pan Double Decker bus will provide a round trip shuttle service on the hour beginning at 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. from the Mile Tree School parking lot to Bolles Road where passengers will join a gathering crowd of spectators at a grandstand with a tented viewing area at Green Meadow Farm. Mark Emerzian, owner of the property reports there is parking for at least 200 cars. Mark Emirzian and his son, Jay will sell a pulled pork barbecue picnic for spectators at Green Meadows Farm with chips and soda or bottled water. Antique cars, novelty sales and entertainment will also be provided there.
   A detailed locus map of the day-long activities will be available on the day of the event and in the program booklet (available at the grandstand and at all parking areas).
A star of the day will certainly be one of only twelve future liners from the 1940 through 1956 era created and built by General Motors. This transport vehicle owned by Peter Pan Bus has a self-contained display with opening side, lighting, retractable stage, distinctive center 'cupola' cockpit driving position and dual wheel front axle. Authentic vehicles and Indian Motocycles will be on display at various Main Street locations along Main Street including the town’s local history museum, The Old Meeting House at 450 Main Street, Wilbraham & Monson Academy gym building parking lot on Mountain Road, Crane Park and Bruuer Pond.
   Indian Motocycles will be on display on loan from the Lyman and Merrie Wood Museum of Springfield History. The Wilbraham United Church will sell a barbecue lunch and the Wilbraham Masonic Lodge will sell baked potato and strawberry shortcake at 500 Main Street. The following pre 1915 horseless carriages are expected to be displayed there: 1912 Steven-Duryea, 1907 Knox Touring, 1911 Cole, and 1912 Oakland Roadster-along with other vintage cars including a Bentley, a Stutz, a Stanley Steamer, and many others. Hill climb commemorative polo shirts will also be sold.
   Krazy Jakes from Boston Road will sell a catered breakfast and lunch menu in Gazebo Park at the town center along with the Indian Motocycle display. Car displays and event activities will occur starting at the Old Meeting House and continuing along Main Street to Wilbraham United Church. Wilbraham Police Safety Officer for the day is Officer Glen Clarke who will be joined by other patrolmen assigned to traffic safety. Co- Event Organizer, Keith Korbut, former director of Connecticut Valley Region Veteran Motor Car Club of America said Monson Road in Wilbraham was a “proving ground” to test run early engines. Springfield manufactured Rolls Royce engines were run up Monson Road in 1906 on a simple frame and wheel chassis, working out any engine problems before attaching the Rolls body to the finished car. Co-Event Organizer Paul Maguire spearheaded the event in early fall when he refurbished the Wilbraham Mountain Hill Climb road sign on Monson Road as part of his department of public works duties.
   He decided to gather interest and car enthusiasts around recreating a hill climb in honor of Wilbraham’s 250th anniversary celebration and the Wilbraham Reenactment Committee was formed. The event is proudly and generously sponsored by John Sampson and Sampson Chapel of the Acres, Peter and Melissa Picknelly and the Peter Pan Bus Company, Wilbraham Tire and Auto Service, the Gaudreau Group, FloDesign Aerospace Technology Everywhere, Leslie Amberger and Lyman Wood, Steve Lewis Subaru, Bill and Cindy Lyons, Quinn’s Fine Jewelry, and the Wilbraham Community Preservation Committee. Members of the Wilbraham Reenactment Committee include: Paul Maguire, Keith and Judy Korbut, George R. Holman Sr., George W. Holman, Jr. and Joan Paris.

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I just received word that registration for the October Texas Mile in Beeville, Texas, will be available August 1th at 2PM. If you are hoping to race there, be ready to file the paperwork "at that hour" as entries fill quickly. Read below to see the "prerequisite" papers that need to be on file "before" you can send your entry. Greg Silkenson raced his Bonneville Ghia at Beeville this past April and hit 141.7 miles per hour so the course is fast and located almost at sea level. 
   October 25-27, 2013. The TEXAS MILE (36hp Challenge). One mile standing start time trial, Beeville, Texas. All VW racers and spectators welcome. For information visit www.info@nasatx.com or email info@texasmile.net. For 36hp & BB Challenge guideline information visit www.burlyb.com.  Burly Burlile   
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   Registration for the October 25-27, 2013 Texas Mile opens on August 11th at 2PM, CST. Once registration is open a link will appear on your profile page on the Texas mile Website. In order to register you must sign in to your profile (that means be pre-registered). If you don't already have a Texas Mile profile you will need to create one in order to register for the event. Your profile will save all of your personal information, medical information, and car or bike information. Once your profile is created registering for the event is as easy as a few clicks of the mouse. Please make sure to fill out each page completely. After you submit payment you will get a confirmation page as well as a confirmation email. I recommend signing into your profile and updating it before registration opens. If you have trouble logging in click on the "forgot username" link on the login page; once you have your user name click on the "forgot password" link on the login page to get your password. Once you are registered please fax in your license paperwork
   If you already have a Texas Mile license than you DO NOT need to fax in your license paperwork. Make sure to bring your hard card license with you to the event and present it to registration so that we can check you in. During online registration check out you will see two additional items available for purchase. The first is tickets for the 10 Year Anniversary Dinner; you, your crew, and your family are invited to attend the dinner. Second, you can purchase a 10 year anniversary limited edition T-Shirt. Hotels in Beeville sell our really fast for the event weekend so get yours reserved today.
   Below is a list of hotels in the area, make sure to mention that you will be attending The Texas Mile when reserving your room; 1) The Hampton Inn (361) 362-2100, 301 South Hall St. Beeville, Texas 78102. 2) Belmont Inn & Suites 2180 U.S. 59, Beeville, Texas 78102. 3) Best Western Texan Inn (361) 358-9999, 2001 E. Hwy 59 Beeville, Texas 78102. 4) Holiday Inn Express & Suites (361) 358-7300 2199 Highway 59 East Beeville, Texas 78102 
   Alternate Accommodations: 1) Motel 6 (361)358-4000 400 U.S. 181 Bypass Beeville, Texas 78102. 2) Hancock House Bed & Breakfast (361) 318-0339, 401 S. Kathleen Beeville, Texas 78102.  3) El Camino Motel (361) 358-2141, 1500 N. E. Washington St. Beeville, Texas 78102. 4) Esquire Motel (361) 358-4451, 3609 N. St. Mary's Beeville, Texas 78102.  5) Star Lite Motel (361) 358-4118, 1211 N. St. Mary's St. Beeville, Texas 78102. 6) Best Western (361) 645-3100, 745 East Pearl Street Goliad, TX 77963. 
   For more information on where to stay and what to eat in Bee County check out http://texasmile.net/lodging.php.  If you have any issues when registering online please give me a call (281) 303-1844. I am always available on my cell or via email info@texasmile.net. Let me know if you have any questions. We hope to see you all very soon. Jessica Reyna J & S Matus Motorsports, Inc. Director of Customer Experience.

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Some photos of Cabriolet Road Club that worked the timers in the DA tower for the Nationals and Pomona I will try and name a few Top left to right

1 Richard Allely 2 Gary  3 Ronald De Sbien  4 Ronny Spiller    5 ?   6  ? 

middle Left to right 1 ?    2 Barrett Glover 3 ?    4  ?  5 Fred Jenkins   6 ?   7 ?   8 Jerry Tyson (me) 

Bottom L--R  1Dean Powley 2 ?  3 ?  4 Bill Bodner  5 Bruce Burtwell    6 ?


There are a hell of a lot of missing photos --the club, at its zenith , had < > 50 members, a garage facility complete with overhead engine hoist--engine work stands-tools-welders- everything under the sun--available to everyone--dues were collected EVERY week --but all the money went back into the club for rent and goodies to improve the facility  I was CEO from 64 to 74  Richard Allely was CFO for all those years and more --he kept the books and reported the financial status every week. WE were the largest and most profitable club in Fla. (probably 2nd or 3rd in the US)
God forgive me --some of the names I have forgotten were the real lifeblood of the organization --each was a character --an individual --each was a equal contributor --everyone had a say. We had elections every fiscal year at the same time.
Funny though ,
Richard (Dick) Allely was re-elected CFO every year for approx 15 years --everyone wanted to race,-work timers for SFTA , NHRA, and buy more equipment to maintain their cars, NO ONE wanted to run the money side. For some strange reason NO ONE wanted to be CEO either--didn't want the responsibility. Ole Rich and I ran the show because no one else wanted it.
As time passes I will dig up all the info U wanna know and get everyone (who remains ) on line and accounted for
There are many stories to tell about this group
PS  Some are on BCC reading all this
Jerry Tyson

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It was the 60s --We had one black guy in our club --his name was Willie Scrivens --Willie was LOVED --this is where we all learned that the blood that surged in his veins was the same as ours--at our last reunion you couldn't get close to him as he was constantly being hugged and surrounded by loving members. Willie brought his son with him, he was absolutely stunned to see his dad mobbed by adoring white folks. We were all "color blind" --

The story of Willie is a whole book within itself

Below are some photo contributions from club members



#1  DAVE BOYD AND LARRY CRAWFORD RACING AT MASTERS FIELD- NOTE FIRST
CHRISTMAS TREE. WHO WON?
#2. CLUB PHOTO HIALEAH -196?
#3  CLUB DISPLAY BAYFRONT PARK AUDITORIUM
#4  PHOENIX CITY, ALABAMA
#5  RAY HERRING AT PALM BEACH DRAGS ( WE MISS YOU)
#6  LARRY CRAWFORD'S ANGLIA- NOTE CABRIOLET DECAL
#7  PHOENIX CITY, ALABAMA
LARRY CRAWFORD TOOK HIS OLD PHOTOS TO STAPLES AND HAD THEM BLOWN UP TO 8
X10'S FOR $1.00 EACH AND THEN SENT THEM TO ME TO PASS ALONG. IF YOU DO NOT
HAVE A SCANNER AND WOULD LIKE TO DO THE SAME THING, GO TO STAPLES, MAKE THE
COPIES AND THEN SEND THEM TO ME TO PASS ALONG. THANK YOU SO MUCH LARRY, FOR
DOING THIS FOR ALL OF US.
THE EMAIL INVITATIONS WILL BE COMING SOON FOR THE CLUB REUNION.

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As promised Here is a extremely rare photo (the only one) made in the early 60s --it was left and forgotten in a closet under some clothes for approx 39-40 years
I think this was made at Detroit Drag-way at the first Nationals --AGAN --I could be wrong --it might be Amelia Airheart field in Miami--too far back to be sure--Left--Left to right --(standing)
 OV Riley (president of Chrondek) -----Jerry "Pegleg" Tyson (me) ---A fellow Cabriolet (who's name I have forgotten ) --Ernie Schorb --
Left to right squatting

Ed (?) I think he was event director before Jack Hart---Tut Clark---A girl (I have forgotten) --George "Weasel" Price --Ronnie "the hillbilly" Spllier --Fred 'freeloader" Jenkins--Jerry "Pots" Angelotti --Barbara Parks--Wally Parks (your Dad)
All the Cabriolets had neat clean white uniforms (with 1 change) and made NHRA proud of their "Timing" team. At Indy, we manned the timers with Bernie Partridge and Dave Mcullen announcing over our shoulders --we had TWO sets of timers -The main set was on the 2nd floor and a backup set on the 3rd floor --running parallel to the same photocells. Upstairs /downstairs/ finish line (ONE lane) were all connected with headsets, so the main set of timers, the backup set , and the finish line ticket writers were all on the same headsets.--- Whenever there was a record or a questionable time, the two timers were compared to within 1 thousand of a second --but the main timer readout was the official word.
I think we were about 40 50 members strong at the time, but a very select few made it to the NHRA events, as it was big deal who went and who stayed home.
The Cabriolets "Timer crew" were exclusive at INDY, Pomona, Thunder Valley, Dallas Int. Motor Speedway (DIMS) , Tallahassee, Amarillo Tx, to name a few--but there was a handful of events that used other people (i.e, Englishtown NJ )
The old international Harvester truck had a 283 cu in Chevy --4 on the floor tranny --a real street rod "sleeper" --used to jump on unsuspecting vetts --surprise the hell outta them.
We used this old truck to go to events, but it was destroyed (on the way to Indy) one year at Haines City in Northern Fla--we were all in a local hospital when Jack Hart (I bet Wally was involved) called and FLEW us all up to Indy to work the show--The club NEVER forgot that gesture and remained a loyal "Timing crew" for 10 years.
Meanwhile there are lot of Cabriolet members still around who can really help--They are on BCC for this first commentary --About 6mo back, almost all appeared at a club reunion--some also had rare pictures to show --I will send some of them in the next installment
JT
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Allard Chrysler new sponsors July 2013
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    It's been awhile since we have communicated, hope all is well in your world. I'm sure you heard the terrible news of Bill Warners death at the Maine Event in Loring on Sunday. His funeral is tomorrow in Little Falls NY where he grew up. I started working with Bill a few months ago to help him promote his new company, National Mile Racing (NMR). NMR bought the rights to the Houston Mile presented by Hennessey Performance. Bill was planning on running 2 one-mile events per year at the Ellington Airport facility and continuing the Houston Half Mile Shootout (Aeros & Autos) as well. (see attached press release)

    I wanted to pass along Bill's updated bio and a few photos to you since he was a dedicated land speed racer with an incredible record. Bill was not into promoting himself, he preferred letting his accomplishments speak for him.

    This is a very sad situation, I only hope Bill's friends and associates make the Houston Mile happen and hopefully name it the Warner Memorial. Stay in touch and let me know if you need more information.

Eric Studer
Eureka Springs, AR 72631

Bill Warner after 300+ mph record run at the Loring Maine 1.5 mile course in 2011 (Photo by Don Smith) 
At 300 mph in 2011. (Photo by David Whealon)

Bill Warner after setting 311 mph record in 2011

Bill Warner preparing for record run at 2013 The Maine Event in Loring Maine.
Richard,
It's been awhile since we have communicated, hope all is well in your world. I'm sure you heard the terrible news of Bill Warners death at the Maine Event in Loring on Sunday. His funeral is tomorrow in Little Falls NY where he grew up. I started working with Bill a few months ago to help him promote his new company, National Mile Racing (NMR). NMR bought the rights to the Houston Mile presented by Hennessey Performance. Bill was planning on running 2 one-mile events per year at the Ellington Airport facility and continuing the Houston Half Mile Shootout (Aeros & Autos) as well. (see attached press release)

I wanted to pass along Bill's updated bio and a few photos to you since he was a dedicated land speed racer with an incredible record. Bill was not into promoting himself, he preferred letting his accomplishments speak for him.

This is a very sad situation, I only hope Bill's friends and associates make the Houston Mile happen and hopefully name it the Warner Memorial. Stay in touch and let me know if you need more information.

Eric Studer
Eureka Springs, AR 72631
(214) 676-3860
 

Attached: Bill Warner Bio & Profile.pdf and Houston Mile-2013 Press Release 3.pdf

 

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Bill Warner after 300+ mph record run at the Loring Maine 1.5 mile course in 2011 (Photo by Don Smith)

Bill Warner after 300+ mph record run at the Loring Maine 1.5 mile course in 2011 (Photo by Don Smith)

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Members:

Jonathan Amo, Brett Arena, Henry Astor, Gale Banks, Glen Barrett, Mike Bastian, Lee Blaisdell, Jim Bremner, Warren Bullis, Burly Burlile, George Callaway, Gary Carmichael, John Backus, John Chambard, Jerry Cornelison, G. Thatcher Darwin, Jack Dolan, Ugo Fadini, Bob Falcon, Rich Fox, Glenn Freudenberger, Don Garlits, Bruce Geisler, Stan Goldstein, Andy Granatelli, Walt James, Wendy Jeffries, Ken Kelley, Mike Kelly, Bret Kepner, Kay Kimes, Jim Lattin, Mary Ann and Jack Lawford, Fred Lobello, Eric Loe, Dick Martin, Ron Martinez, Tom McIntyre, Don McMeekin, Bob McMillian, Tom Medley, Jim Miller, Don Montgomery, Bob Morton, Mark Morton, Paula Murphy, Landspeed Louise Ann Noeth, Frank Oddo, David Parks, Richard Parks, Wally Parks (in memoriam), Eric Rickman, Willard Ritchie, Roger Rohrdanz, Evelyn Roth, Ed Safarik, Frank Salzberg, Dave Seely, Charles Shaffer, Mike Stanton, David Steele, Doug Stokes, Bob Storck, Zach Suhr, Maggie Summers, Gary Svoboda, Pat Swanson, Al Teague, JD Tone, Jim Travis, Randy Travis, Jack Underwood and Tina Van Curen, Richard Venza.
 

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